1) PNG na Australia i wokbung long stopim korapsin

Updated 4 October 2012, 18:44 AEST

Tupela kantri i wanbel long mekim moa long fait agensim korapsin insait long olgeta AusAid program blong Australia long Papua New Guinea.

AusAID's director general Peter Baxter says he is taking a "zero tolerance" approach to fraud and corruption among their officials in Papua New Guinea.

Peter Baxter blong Ausaid i tok i mas i gat commitment long investiget na bringim ol dispela i mekim rong igo long kot.

Australia na Papua New Guinea i pasim tok orait pinis long mekim bikpela ol wok bilong pait agensim fraud na corruption long moni ikam long Aid progrem bilong Australia long Papua New Guinea.

PNG korespondent Liam Fox i ripot olsem, i tru level bilong fraud long forein aid progrem bilong Australia i liklik, planti long ol keis ol i painim aut i kamap insait long PNG.
Long dispela yar AusAID bai spendim klostu haf bilian dola long PNG na tupela gavman i sainim wanpela agrimen long pasim fraud na korapsen.
Dairekta blong AusAid, Peter Baxter i tok, namel long en i mas i gat commitment long investiget na bringim ol dispela i mekim rong igo long kot.
National Planning Minista blong Papua New Guinea, Charles Abel i tok dispela agrimen bai fit gut wantaim anti-corruption plen em gavman bilong em i gat pinis.

2) Australian funded Police unit eyed as harassing West Papua group

By Online Editor
09:58 am GMT+12, 05/10/2012, Indonesia

 An Australian-funded counter-terrorism unit in West Papua is facing new accusations of abusing its powers in the troubled Indonesian province.

The notorious squad known as Detachment 88 has launched a fresh crackdown on independence activists, in the wake of an expose by in August. Eight men have been detained and accused of bomb-making, but separatist leaders claim the explosives were planted and they’ve been framed to justify the squad’s activities.

The region has been the scene of violence and tension in 2012, with independence leaders arrested, beaten and killed, and police confronted by unruly and angry demonstrations.

In June, Indonesian soldiers went on a rampage in the highland’s town of Wamena, a stronghold of the West Papua National Committee, which is known as KNPB.

Last weekend police were again targeting the area, raiding the homes and offices of KNPB members.

Eight people were arrested and witnesses, including KNPB leader Victor Yeimo, say once again the Australian-trained and funded police unit Detachment 88 was involved.

“When they arrest the KNPB brothers in Wamena, we saw Detachment 88 with one car, and another car with police, joined in by TNI (the Indonesian military),”Yeimo said.

Indonesian police accuse those arrested of making bombs and claim to have found explosives during the raid.

Yeimo rejects that and says his group is being framed as terrorists to justify Detachment 88’s presence.

In West Papua, the Institute for Human Rights Advocacy, known as ELSHAM, has studied the arrests and suspects the explosives recovered by police were planted.

It is a view that is supported in Australia by advocates of the West Papuan cause.

“They don’t have the capacity to gain the materials, so ELSHAM has actually said that the material was probably planted in the KNPB member houses where they found the explosives, and that’s not an unusual thing for security forces to do,” says Cammi Webb-Gannon, from the University of Sydney’s West Papua project.

“I don’t think KNPB has any reason to be making bombs because they believe in a peaceful approach to pursuing independence, they want a referendum on independence in West Papua.”

Detachment 88, which is trained by Australia as part of counter-terrorism operations, has also been linked to a string of incidents in which Papuan independence leaders have been arrested and killed.

When 7.30 travelled to the province in August, the crackdown on the independence movement was already severe and had resulted in several deaths, including the killing of former KNPB leader Mako Tabuni.

Witnesses say he was shot in a street by Detachment 88.

Victor Yeimo succeeded Tabuni as leader of the KNPB and since then, he says the crackdown has worsened as he takes the campaign public.

“We are the non-violent activists in West Papua,” he says in a video sent to 7.30.

“We will fight for our right of freedom according to peaceful means in West Papua.

“We demand our right of self-determination, for referendum to be held in West Papua peacefully and democratically.”

But the Indonesian authorities do not believe his claim of non-violence and they are pursuing KNPB like never before.

International observers say it is because the Indonesian government is threatened by the movement.

Cammi Webb-Gannon says the Papuan movement’s international links could explain Indonesia’s concern.

“First of all a lot of them are young, they’re students, or have recently been students,” she told 7.30.

“So they do have a lot of passion, a lot of fire, they have a popular support base, they work from a very grassroots perspective, and I think Indonesia is worried because they do have these international links.”

The weekend raids follow the appointment of a new police chief in Papua, Brigadier General Tito Karnavian.

His background as the former head of Detachment 88 generates serious unease among some Papuans despite his assurances of a new inclusive approach.

“They will be opposed to his former role as head of Densus (Detachment) 88, and as a police chief it doesn’t seem to mesh with his new approach of working to win the hearts and minds of Papuans,” Webb-Gannon said.

7.30 put several questions to the Indonesian government about the latest situation in Papua but received no reply. Attempts to contact the new Papuan police chief were also unsuccessful.

As for Yeimo, he is pushing for the release of the eight activists arrested on the weekend.

And with his supporters in Australia, he is pressuring the Australian Government to rethink its funding for Detachment 88.

“The Papuans will be pretty much living like prisoners in our own land, where our movement, what we do will be censored, will be followed, will be monitored,” Kareni said.

“There’s no room for democracy at all.”.

SOURCE: WEST PAPUA/PACNEWS

 3) Memorial for Papuans killed in action unveiled in Netherlands

Posted at 01:39 on 05 October, 2012 UTC

A monument for Papuans killed in action during the period of 1942 – 1962 was unveiled at the Royal Estate home for veteran soldiers in Arnhem, the Netherlands.

The monument was paid by veterans of former Netherlands New Guinea which is now known as Indonesia’s Papua province.

The unveiling ceremony was performed by Major General Alexander Oostendorp, the Director of Operations at Netherlands Defence Staff in front of about 900 New Guinea veterans and other persons.

Radio New Zealand International

4) Eight missing in New Ireland waters

By Online Editor
1:09 pm GMT+12, 05/10/2012, Papua New Guinea

 Eight people are missing in the waters of New Ireland.

Four men, four women, and a three-year-old child had left Kavieng early last Friday for Musau Island when they went missing.

Local authorities say they were travelling in a 60 horse-powered dinghy.

They say, at that time, the weather was bad with strong winds and high waves.

Alerts have been sent out to outstations to keep a look-out for the missing boat, but there have been no sightings to date.

The National Maritime Safety Authority had been asked to help with an aircraft to search the coastline of the entire province.

The local Red Cross fear the boat either sank with its passengers, or the boat was pushed out by the strong winds to the open seas.

The local Red Cross and Provincial Disaster Office are asking people to not go out to sea, when the weather is bad.

SOURCE: NBC/PACNEWS

 5) Yatch suspected in human trafficking in Fiji seized

By Online Editor
1:26 pm GMT+12, 05/10/2012, Fiji

 A yatch suspected of being involved in human trafficking and sex trade is in the custody of Fiji maritime authorities.

Maritime Safety Authority of Fiji seized the yacht near Malake Island in Rakiraki, close to where three sisters disappeared in 2005.

FMSAF standard and compliance manager John Tunidau confirmed this Thursday. Although details of the owner and the name of the yacht was not released, Tunidau said the yacht was under the watchful eyes of port security.

He said an 18-year-old Fijian girl of Indian descent, believed to be the fourth victim involved in the alleged criminal activity, was taken into custody.

He said they managed to ascertain that the girl was to be taken away to another country and that it was by miracle that they managed to save her.

He said items and materials that were confiscated from the yacht implicated the owner’s involvement in alleged criminal activities.

“We have confiscated everything from the yacht and the girl is in police custody,” Tunidau said.

He said the incident had prompted FMSAF and border security to tighten their operation in the Fiji waters.

“It’s sad to say that these activities are happening in Fiji. This is the first time we have come across this type of activity and we know that there are a lot more of this nature happening in our waters.”

He said they hoped to speed up their operation once their boats arrived from overseas.

“That’s our problem. We do not have enough boats to conduct more operations, not only involving super yachts, but other vessels in our waters,” he added.

SOURCE: FIJI TIMES/PACNEWS

 6) Fiji lawyer Chaudhry suspended

By Online Editor
1:23 pm GMT+12, 05/10/2012, Fiji

 Suva lawyer Rajendra Chaudhry has been suspended from practicing in Fiji, according to FBC News.

The suspension was handed down by the Independent Legal Services Commission Friday.

Chaudhry has been suspended until March 2017.

However, he is allowed to remain in practice for the next 21 days in order to hand over current cases.

Another lawyer Kini Maraiwai has also been suspended from practicing until March 2016.

Both have also been publicly reprimanded and are to pay $1,000 (US$560) each to the Commission as costs.

The pair were found guilty of misconduct following a hearing in August.

SOURCE: FBC/PACNEWS

7) Fiji’s Constitution Chairman Ghai impressed

By Online Editor
1:18 pm GMT+12, 05/10/2012, Fiji

 Labasa is the way Fiji should be, says Constitution Commission chairman Professor Yash Ghai after describing the 115 submissions at the Civic Centre Building Thursday  as “constructive and to the point”.

Despite the geographical conditions, transportation problems and the short duration of the commission’s visit to the northern town, Prof Ghai said people made an effort to be present at the venue.

“I am really happy with the submissions we’ve heard so far because it doesn’t boil up too much tensions and disagreement,” Prof Ghai said.

“People are very constructive and straight to the point and also there are not much repetition of submissions.”

Prof Ghai said he wished the commission could spend more time in the north but they were behind with their schedule.

“I only wish we had more time in the north to visit all the places as complaints have been made against our short visit but it seems like we are competing with our schedule with time running out on us,” he said.

“Most of the submissions are made in groups and we are really appreciative of that because they are considering our time limit.”

Meanwhile, the constitution should retain the Bill of Rights.

As part of her submission in Labasa, Neomai Maravuakula, who travelled all the way from Suva, requested the new constitution reflect Fiji’s commitment to international laws and treaties that our government had ratified.

“I request the commission to draft this section in such a way that it may not be revoked nor reviewed by any future government in control,” Maravuakula said.

“In the past weeks, the people of Fiji have reflected and requested the commission to ensure that the new constitution will not allow another coup to happen in the country.

“My request to you today is to ensure that no matter the national political activities, no one must be able to take away the rights of the people of this country.”

She said the State, whether military or civilian, must protect human dignity on the basis of human rights which were directly applicable.

“I also request that the constitution clearly lays out the roles that is to be undertaken by government officials and bodies.”.

SOURCE: FIJI TIMES/PACNEWS

8) Search underway in Kiribati for three missing at sea

Posted at 03:18 on 05 October, 2012 UTC

The United States Coast Guard is searching for three fishermen on a skiff off Tarawa atoll in Kiribati.

The three men were travelling from Maiana Island to Tarawa, and were reported missing on Tuesday

A Coast Guard HC-130 Hercules aircraft has been deployed to the area to assist in the search efforts.

The Coast Guard’s Anthony L Soto says searchers are using drift patterns to try to find the missing men.

“We are using data marker buoys, which assist us in calculating the drift and current direction in the water. And we have adjusted our calibrations for our search models to conform with the types of boats matching descriptions of their canoes, which are little bit different than the vessels which we are more use to searching for, mostly because these vessels are smaller and more susceptible to wind and currents.”

Petty officer Third Class, Anthony L Soto.

Radio New Zealand International

 

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