Smol Melanesian Na Pasifik Nius Digest # 686

1) PNG i strongim investman long Fiji

Updated 23 November 2012, 8:06 AEST

Caroline Tiriman

Planti bisnis laen blong Papua New Guinea nau i kirapim ol bisnis blong ol long Fiji.

Foto blong ol PNG turisam singsing laen blong Highlands rijan (Credit: ABC)
Odio: Ripot blong Caroline Tiriman long strongpla bisnis wokbung namel long Fiji na PNG

Papua New Guinea na Fiji nau iwok long strongim ol wokbung long saed blong bisnis investments.

Planti bisnis laen blong Papua New Guinea nau iwok long statim ol bisnis blong ol long Fiji. Despla i min olsem oli bringim planti handrat milian dola igo long ikonomi blong Fiji.

Sampla bisnis lida  blong Papua New Guinea Chairman itok oli laikim  ol investment blong ol bai gat namba long Pacific rijan.

http://www.radioaustralia.net.au/tokpisin/2012-11-23/png-i-strongim-investman-long-fiji/1050660

 2) Solomons i lonsim bisnis senta

Updated 23 November 2012, 8:27 AEST

Caroline Tiriman

Solomon Islands i redi nau long bildim  Economic Crowth senta long Malaita bihaen long Praim Minista Gordon Darcy Lilo ibin brukim graon long  East Malaita long Tuesday.

Odio: Dr Tarcicius Tara Kabutaulaka, politikal ikonomist long Universiti of Hawaii itoktok wantem Caroline Tiriman

Despla tingting blong kamapim ol growth senta long ol rural eria emi stap aninit long ol bikpla plan blong National Coalition na  Rural Advancement (NCRA) gavman.

Oli ting olsem ol despla senta bai halvim long bringim divelopman, na tu kamapim gut ol sevis olsem ol roads, hospital edukeisan igo long ol rural eria.

Tasol  Dr Tarcicius Tara Kabutaulaka blong Center for Pacific Islands Studies long University blong Hawaii itok emi no save sopos despla tingting bai wok gut oa nogat.

http://www.radioaustralia.net.au/tokpisin/2012-11-23/solomons-i-lonsim-bisnis-senta/1050668

3) Pilot error, weather blamed for 2010 PNG plane crash

Posted 23 November 2012, 9:21 AEST

Firmin Nanol in Port Moresby

The final report into a 2010 plane crash in PNG that killed three Australians and a New Zealander has concluded that pilot error and bad weather were to blame.

The final report into a 2010 plane crash in PNG that killed three Australians and a New Zealander has concluded that pilot error and bad weather were to blame.

The Cessna Citation burst into flames at the end of a runway on Misima Island in PNG’s Milne Bay province in August 2010.

According to the report, the runway was flooded in poor weather conditions, which made it hard for the plane to land and affected its brakes.

The Chief Executive Officer of PNG’s Accident Investigations Commission, David Inau, says the report’s findings should be used to improve conditions at the country’s aerodromes.

“We are not here to blame anybody,” he said.

“It is the responsibility of the operators to ensure that the condition of the airstrip is suitable for their operations.

“If the operator is satisfied that the airstrip is safe, then they can operate in and out of that aerodrome.”

He says all airlines operating in the country should report such incidents to the relevant regulatory authorities so improvement could be made to the aerodromes and aircrafts in operation.

David Inau says in this case, the operator, Trans Air did not notify them.

“We has in place legislation that requires…anybody who’s working in the aviation industry, if they notice anything that can contribute to an accident, they must report,” he said.

“It’s incumbent on every operation…to report matters of safety concern.”

The Australian victims were marine pilot Chris Hart, Trans Air co-owner Les Wright, and Darren Moore, who was believed to be working for PNG’s civil aviation authority.

The plane’s 25-year-old co-pilot, Kelby Cheyne, survived the crash.

The Commission says Trans Air was using a local operators license and they are no longer operating in PNG.

PNG’s Accident Investigations Commission was set up in 2010 following several fatal plane crashes in the country.

David Inau says it has taken so long to conclude investigations into major crashes due to logistics and staff to do the work for the Commission.

“It’s taken this long to release a report because the processes involved are very lenghty,” he said.

“We have to travel to interview pilots, interviews relatives of the survivors, interview pilots who are involved in the previous incident and Missima and we have to have the engines tested in a laboratory which is not available in this country.

“So, it takes a while to get all these things done.”

http://www.radioaustralia.net.au/international/2012-11-23/pilot-error-weather-blamed-for-2010-png-plane-crash/1050690

4) Papuan pastor shot dead in Merauke

Posted at 02:28 on 23 November, 2012 UTC

A pastor has been found dead with a gunshot wound to her head, on a street in Merauke of Indonesia’s Papua province.

The victim was identified as Frederika Metalmeti, the pastor of the Bethlehem Pentecostal church in Boven Digoel district.

The Jakarta Globe reports that a Merauke Military commander claims Frederika was shot by a member of the military.

Police say they are investigating.

Radio New Zealand International

5) Plans for indigenous Papua New Guineans to control small retail businesses

Posted at 02:28 on 23 November, 2012 UTC

Papua New Guinea’s Commerce and Industry Minister, Richard Maru, says Papua New Guineans must take control of their economy.

He has told parliament the government will enact in legislation to ensure small to medium businesses are reserved for indigenous people.

Mr Maru also says a new Papua New Guinea Banking Corporation will start operating by early next year to cater for small business people.

Mr Maru says 90 percent of all businesses in the formal sector are owned by outsiders with Papua New Guinea left to pick up the crumbs.

The Post Courier reports the minister saying under the legislation, all shops, fast-food and other outlets will be run by Papua New Guineans only.

He says they also want to ensure that a Papua New Guinean owns at least 50 percent of any joint venture company.

And Mr Maru says the National Development Bank from next year will have more money available at lower rates for ordinary Papua New Guineans.

Radio New Zealand International

6) Lilo meets O’Neill

FRIDAY, 23 NOVEMBER 2012 09:36

PM Lilo meets his PNG counterpart Peter O’Neill.

Prime Minister Gordon Darcy Lilo yesterday met his Papua New Guinea counterpart Peter O’Neill in capital Port Moresby.

The two leaders met briefly in the margins of the Pacific African Caribbean and Pacific (PACP) meeting.Mr Lilo said he received positive indications from his PNG counterpart, which were formally discussed yesterday.

Free movement of skilled labour, education support from PNG, taxation issues and general cooperation between the two countries were top on the agenda of the two leaders’ meeting.

Prior to the meeting, new Solomon Islands high commissioner William Haomae delivered his letter of introduction to Prime Minister O’Neil before he accompanied Prime Minister Lilo for the bilateral meeting.

7)Smaller airlines in Pacific feel shut out by big players

Posted at 02:28 on 23 November, 2012 UTC

The head of Solomon Islands’ national carrier says the region’s bigger airlines are making it difficult for smaller companies to enter new territory.

Solomon Airlines recently entered into a new agreement with Air Vanuatu, where it will codeshare on its flights from Honiara to Port Vila and onto Nadi.

The airline’s manager, Gus Kraus, says the new relationship is partly a result of Fiji’s Air Pacific recently ending its codeshare agreement with Air Vanuatu.

He says for three years they’ve been in negotiations with Papua New Guinea’s Air Niugini for a codeshare on a Honiara to Port Moresby service, but haven’t got anywhere.

“We’ve been trying to push Air Niugini to apply to their regulators to allow us to take on 15 to 20 seats per flight of their twice a week flight, we can’t even get that across the line. Yet they’ve got 104 seats on each flight that departs Moresby to Honiara and back.”

Gus Kraus says Air Pacific and Air Niugini have got their own priorities.

Radio New Zealand International

8)

Nyus i kam long MP mo Pati

Intaviu blo mi lo FM96 tumoro

Olgeta –
Bae i gat wan intaviu wetem mi lo FM96 “Buzz FM” tumoro stat lo 12 klok kasem 2 kolok aftenun.
Hemi wan niufala program we bae mi 1st gest long hem.
Yu save luk toktok blong bos blong FM96, Marc Neil-Jones, i tokbaot redio show ia tumoro.
Ta, Ralph 

From Marc Neil-Jones:
On Saturday 12am – 2pm lunch time 96 BUZZ FM has got a great new show starting with a great new and different style of a far more personal interview with Vanuatu’s most popular MP Ralph Regenvanu about his life. Interviewed by myself it is his life through 10 of his all time favourite music tracks that has meant something to him in his life and Ralph explains why the music chosen is so important to him PLUS he answers questions on how he got into politics, his music and art background plus he answers questions on racism he experienced at school in Australia, the use of marijuana by youth today and the push to decriminalise it, government corruption and more. This is a fascinating interview the like of which radio has not heard before. Get your friends tuning in to 96 BUZZ FM Saturday midday after the news and get to know more about what makes Ralph tick. Tell people about it.

 

9) Investment incentives

Timoci Vula
Friday, November 23, 2012

FIJI now offers one of the lowest corporate tax rates in the region at 17 per cent for foreign companies that establish or relocate their headquarters to Fiji.

This was part of the 2013 National Budget revenue policies announced by the Prime Minister and Minister for Finance Commodore Voreqe Bainimarama yesterday.

Commodore Bainimarama also announced the reduction of corporate tax rate for newly listed companies on the South Pacific Stock Exchange (SPSE) from 20 per cent to 18.5 per cent.

However, the condition was that the company must have 40 per cent local shareholding structure.

To encourage new investment, Eastern Viti Levu or from Korovou to Tavua has been declared a tax free region. The benefits of investing in this region include a tax holiday for 13 years, tax holiday for 20 years if investing in the dairy industry.

Companies investing in the dairy industry will also enjoy import duty exemption on the importation of raw materials, machinery and equipment (including parts and materials) purchased for the establishment of the business for 12 months from the date of approval.

However, companies have to be newly incorporated with a minimum investment of $1million.

The government has also retained the export income deduction at 40 per cent to promote growth in the export sector.

To promote employment creation, the Employment Taxation Scheme, which allows 150 per cent tax deduction will be extended to 2014.

Tax deductions have also been allowed for the donation of computers to schools. Those who donate new personal computers, laptops and tablets will enjoy a 200 per cent deduction if it is to schools in rural areas.

10)Pension for 70 and over

Nasik Swami
Friday, November 23, 2012

+ Enlarge this image

Senior citizens who are 70 years and over will be entitled to pensions as announced by Prime Minister Commodore Voreqe Bainimarama yesterday. Picture: JONACANI LALAKOBAU

A PENSION will be provided to Fijians aged 70 years and over who do not have any form of income from January next year.

This was revealed by Prime Minister and Finance Minister Commodore Voreqe Bainimarama.

Commodore Bainimarama said the initiative by the government was a first for Fiji.

He said 9000 Fijians who did not have any income, pension or had never been part of a superannuation scheme would benefit from this assistance.

“The budget for this program is $3.2million,” Commodore Bainimarama said.

The Ministry of Social Welfare, Women and Poverty Alleviation has been tasked with the role of controlling this new pension project.

Minister of Women and Social Welfare Dr Jiko Luveni said the announcement for people above 70 years was exciting.

“It is an exciting program because it is available to anyone above 70 years and who is not receiving any form of income at all,” Dr Luveni said.

She explained that those entitled for pensions should not be receiving any form of income even though they live with their families who support them.

“We need senior citizens to have money, we need to give them the confidence and to be happy and comfortable with their lives and contribute to their family welfare,” Dr Luveni said.

Under Fiji’s social welfare system, a household will receive a maximum of $150 per month including a $30 food voucher.

“Nearly 13,000 poor households will benefit and we will increase the coverage of our poor population from the current three per cent to 10 per cent. The total budget for this program is $22.7million,” Commodore Bainimarama said.

He said the care and protection program, which targeted children, would continue with a budget of $5.9million.

“With an allocation next year of $500,000, the welfare graduation scheme focuses on moving recipients from welfare to workfare. Fiji cannot support a culture of dependency. We must commit ourselves to the idea that poverty is a temporary state,” the Prime Minister said.

11)Pay rise for civil servants

Timoci Vula
Friday, November 23, 2012

MORE than 4500 civil servants should expect an increase in their take home pay come their first pay next year.

In his budget announcement, Prime Minister Commodore Voreqe Bainimarama said all established staff in the civil service would receive a minimum salary of $10,000 a year — a raise which would benefit 1662 civil servants.

All 2878 unestablished government wage earners on the other hand, will receive a 10 per cent rise.

The cost of the increase is $5.7million.

Also government will introduce performance-based bonuses throughout the civil service.

Commodore Bainimarma said this underscored government’s fundamental belief that individuals should be rewarded on merit and accomplishment.

“No longer will seniority and personal connections be a path to advancement. We want to reward the best people and keep them working in government,” he said. “We must retain highly skilled and capable officers in the civil service. Too often, they are lost to the private sector or regional and international organisations.”

Public Service permanent secretary Parmesh Chand said the pay rise was big news for the staff.http://www.fijitimes.com/story.aspx?id=217958

12 ) Mais où est donc passée l’île Sandy?

Mis à jour 23 November 2012, 11:02 AEST

Caroline Lafargue

Présente sur les cartes, absente des océans, l’île mystérieuse nourrit tous les fantasmes.

Ce sont des scientifiques australiens qui ont révélé sa disparition hier jeudi. L’équipe de chercheurs menée par Maria Seton, spécialisée en géophysique marine, rentre d’un voyage de 25 jours à bord du « Southern Surveyor ».
Initialement, le but de leurs recherches en Mer de Corail était de retrouver les fragments de la plaque tectonique australienne, qui se sont dispersés il y a 100 millions d’années quand l’Australie s’est détachée du Gondwana. Ce super continent agglomérait alors l’Inde, l’Afrique, l’Antarctique et l’Australie. Cette dérive des continents s’est accompagnée de la création de la Mer de Tasman entre l’Australie et l’actuelle Nouvelle-Zélande. Ces fragments du continent australien sont aujourd’hui submergés. «Nous étions à la recherche de ces fragments de notre pays», explique Maria Seton.
Mais cette mission scientifique a pris une toute autre tournure quand le « Southern Surveyor » s’est approché de l’île Sandy. On écoute le récit du géologue Steven Micklethwaite, professeur à l’Université d’Australie Occidentale, qui a participé à cette expédition sur le « Southern Surveyor » :
«Marie Seton a remarqué que sur la route que nous empruntions passait au large d’une île inconnue. Cette île figure sur toutes les cartes de Google Earth et les cartes du temps, elle est répertoriée dans la base de données mondiale sur les régions côtières. Mais dès que nous zoomions sur l’île sur Google Earth, il n’y avait qu’une tâche noire, Google ne pouvait rien voir. Alors on s’est dit c’est vraiment bizarre, nous sommes montés au poste de pilotage du bateau et nous avons découvert que l’île Sandy n’était pas indiquée sur nos cartes marines. Donc là on s’est demandé à qui nous devions faire confiance : Google Earth ou nos cartes marines ? Et comme nous n’étions pas loin, nous avons décidé de faire un petit crochet, et nous n’avons rien trouvé, nous avons navigué sur l’endroit où l’île était indiquée, or les fonds sont profonds, 1300 mètres de profondeur, donc c’est pas comme si l’île avait été engloutie il y a peu. Donc cette île Sandy n’existe pas !» 
Et cette désormais fameuse île Sandy aurait normalement du se trouver entre l’Australie et la Nouvelle-Calédonie, dans les eaux territoriales françaises, en Mer de Corail. Reste à savoir pourquoi l’île fantôme apparaît et disparaît selon les cartes:
«Nous enquêtons toujours sur cette affaire. Déjà, nous avons appris que la CIA, l’agence de renseignement américaine, est la principale source de cette base de données mondiale sur les régions côtières. Nous ne savons toujours pas comment cette île mystérieuse est apparue sur les cartes, mais il pourrait très bien s’agir d’une erreur de cartographie commise à la source par la CIA. De quoi nourrir les fantasmes de théorie du complot. Mais nous continuons l’enquête.» 
Notons que selon Mike Prince, le directeur du Service Hydrographique Australien, qui produit les cartes marines destinées à la marine australienne, la base de données mondiale sur les régions côtières n’est pas toujours très fiable, et qu’il prend toujours ses informations avec des pincettes.
Découvrir une île qui n’existe pas, c’est du pain béni pour une expédition scientifique, en 2012. On n’est plus au temps des grandes explorations du globe et des circumnavigations, et pourtant la carte du monde est bel et bien changée depuis les révélations de jeudi :
«Nous n’étions pas partis pour découvrir une île mystérieuse, c’est une découverte tout à fait fortuite, et heureuse. Ce genre de choses qui arrivent en sciences, quand vous êtes au bon endroit, au bon moment. Donc c’est très excitant. Vous vous rendez compte, le capitaine et nous les scientifiques nous pouvons nous dire que nous avons changé le monde, ou en tout cas la carte du monde, et ça donne le vertige.» 
C’était Steven Micklethwaite, interviewé par nos confrères de Fairfax Media.
De son côté, le bureau de Google Maps en Australie et Nouvelle-Zélande précise qu’il consulte toujours une variété de sources pour faire ses cartes, mais qu’on n’est jamais à l’abri d’une erreur. Google Maps demande aux internautes de les lui signaler.
http://www.radioaustralia.net.au/french/2012-11-23/mais-où-est-donc-passée-lîle-sandy/1050746

13) Australie: la loi contre le bois illégal agace la PNG et l’Indonésie

Mis à jour 23 November 2012, 11:05 AEST

Caroline Lafargue

Lundi le Parlement australien a voté une loi punissant l’importation de bois illégal, ainsi que la transformation du bois illégal sur le sol australien.

L’Australie rejoint ainsi l’Union européenne et les Etats-Unis, qui ont des législations similaires. «La loi punit les importateurs australiens et l’industrie du bois, pas nos partenaires commerciaux ni les exportateurs de bois illégal», a précisé le Ministre des Forêts, Joe Ludwig. Environ 9% du bois importé en Australie est d’origine illégale.
En Papouasie Nouvelle-Guinée, cette loi australienne suscite l’inquiétude. Le pays est connu pour être le théâtre d’une exploitation forestière illégale à grande échelle. Mais les professionnels papous de l’industrie du bois estiment que les conditions et certifications désormais demandées par l’Australie vont aussi freiner les exportations papoues de bois d’origine légale.
Et Kanawi Pouru, le directeur de l’Autorité Papoue des Forêts, regrette de ne pas avoir été consulté :
«Comme l’Australie est notre plus grand marché d’exportation de bois transformé, nous aurions aimé être consultés avant le vote de cette loi, ils auraient pu faire un voyage en Papouasie Nouvelle-Guinée, rencontrer les entreprises, comprendre comment fonctionne le greffage, etc. histoire de comprendre comment nous avons organisé l’exploitation forestière dans notre pays. Mais l’Australie a raté l’occasion.» 
De toutes les manières, sur le papier les lois papoues contre l’exploitation forestière illégale sont déjà suffisamment efficaces pour garantir que les exportations vers l’Australie sont légales:
«Nous avons de très bonnes lois, elles fonctionnent, elles sont appliquées. Après, la difficulté, c’est de doter toutes les autorités, dont la mienne, de ressources financières et en personnel suffisantes pour faire respecter pleinement les lois.» 
Kanawi Pouru répondait à Campbell Cooney sur Radio Australie.
Notons que l’Indonésie non plus n’a pas apprécié cette nouvelle loi australienne et elle envisage de poser un recours devant l’OMC, estimant que la nouvelle loi australienne équivaut à une entrave au libre-échange.Radio Autralia.

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